These are rough draft ideas and essays and programming tips which it seems appropriate to put online.

Hopefully you can find something you find interesting here, though I reckon things will be perfectly fine if you don't.

I recently migrated this site off WordPress and to Grav, which lost some metadata and images, so if you find bits and pieces missing, let me know and I'll fix it.

If you get this error while running the iRedMail install script:

[FAIL] Starting nginx: nginx failed! invoke-rc.d: initscript nginx, action "start" failed. dpkg: error processing package nginx-full (--configure): installed nginx-full package post-installation script subprocess returned error exit status 1 Errors were encountered while processing: nginx-full E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1) << ERROR >> Installation failed, please check the terminal output. << ERROR >> If you're not sure what the problem is, try to get help in iRedMail << ERROR >> forum: https://forum.iredmail.org/

It's because nginx is arguing with Apache over ports. You need to stop Apache and start the script again, like this:

root@mx:~/iRedMail-1.3.1# service apache2 stop

root@mx:~/iRedMail-1.3.1# bash iRedMail.sh

That's all.

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I finally found a way to convey an elusive degree of intelligence which is primarily compassionate, an idea which I long contemplated, but could never put into words as well as I can now, thanks to an insight buried in the Dunning-Kruger effect which few people are seeing.

When I first encountered mention of the Dunning-Kruger effect, it was a curious new statistically-driven point noted in a few obscure science discussions. Shortly thereafter, I saw my smart, snarkier friends begin posting references to it on social media. As far as I could tell, all of them posted it with an implied, self-righteous condescension toward stupid people, like they were saying: "See? Stupid people don't even know they're stupid! How stupid they are. Tsk tsk." Meanwhile, none of my more concrete-minded friends have ever mentioned Dunning-Kruger, and probably never will. It is as irrelevant to them as yes...

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A story I once heard, but a quick search didn't turn up details, so if others have more information, let me know in the comments: Somewhere in the 70s there was a drive to develop software for Air Traffic Controllers to use. The first iteration of the software was an abysmal failure. The second iteration, done more carefully with lessons learned, was also an abysmal failure. So the third time around, the software architects recruited air traffic controllers to learn how to write software, and taught them how to code. This team created a system that worked, and worked well for decades.

Whether the story is true is unknown to me, but the point is clear: There is something known in a language beyond language, an inner intuition, about complex multi-dimensional interactions, which is very difficult to touch with the linear world of words, Greek logic, and rational, scientific thought.

(...

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At the time this is written, the mathematics and logic of D. G. Leahy are less well known than his philosophical and theological work. Yet it may be for his mathematics that he is remembered longest. For Leahy has discovered a mathematical structure of pre-primordial dimension, a layer of math beneath the bottom layer, so to speak. Or maybe a better way to say it: he discovered the ultimate cube-shaped gem at the center of mathematics, which is... not normally known as something with a center? It's a category-buster, whatever else you want to call it. Along the way to describing this mathematical cubical gem, D.G. Leahy touches on related structures within logic, DNA, the fine structure constant, and more. He goes into topology, geometry, perfect Riemannian spheres in an "absolutely ordered imaginary context," tensors, the math of crystals, Fibonacci spirals, and more. Always more; the...

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I first encountered reference to Schopenhauer in "Love Can Open Prison Doors" by Starr Daily, which is a truly remarkable story, short enough you can get through it in a day or two. This slim volume provides the best insight into the mechanics of love I have yet encountered. Daily was a habitual criminal and therefore prisoner who, long-story-short, one day began to realize how love could transform the life of a liar, con, scoundrel, rioter, and escape-artist into a life of honest, productive, sublime, contemplative, joy . . . complete with that rare innocence of childhood we all miss, coupled with mature wisdom we all seek. Its allegory is one of my favorites ever, so I remember small details like its references to Schopenhauer even though I read it many years ago.

[caption id="attachment_1627" align="alignright" width="300"]Schopenhauer Schopenhauer[/caption]

The author Daily mentions how,...

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