• The Greek subject lives in the excluded middle of binary logic

    Posted in Mathy Stuff on Jun 12, 2019

    Well, well, well. I am delighted to find yet another piece of private intuition has a respectable home already existing in the public domain. I've been working on this insight for years, but not able to put it into words well enough to relay it to others coherently. Much to my delight, I find that Schrödinger already had the same observation, and saw it more clearly than me, though apparently not many realized the importance of what he was saying.

    I was reading an article about the rather interesting angle on a new quantum theory called "Quantum Bayesianism" when I came across the following qu...

  • Ternary logic and a coin toss

    Posted in Mathy Stuff, Postinfinity Tergiversation, Pre-Preprint Stuff on Jun 12, 2019

    Discovered a quick way to illustrate the value of ternary over binary logic. Think of a coin toss. Although it might take millions of times, there is a tiny possibility that the coin could land on its edge. What do you call this result, in the binary world of heads or tails?

    This is a crude example (and it can be described with binary logic if you add one layer of abstraction), but it effectively shows how ternary logic can explain things more holistically than binary. It doesn't convey the true nature of the "third pole" either, but it does give a place to introduce that topic.

    A better exam...

  • Unitarity and locality are linked to time and space

    Posted in Mathy Stuff, Postinfinity Tergiversation, Pre-Preprint Stuff on May 30, 2019

    Just figured out that unitarity and locality are linked to time and space, respectively. I've known for a while now that time is a purely mental thing which has no physical existence outside of the present moment. (This is empirically proven, for those new to the idea). As a consequence, I've been intuiting what it looks like if space completely collapses to a comparatively tiny now (in space that would be... "here"), but not making much progress. Then today I discovered a controversial theory in the mathematics of quantum physics which operates "without unitarity or locality." Searching these...

  • Iota is a smart, clever actor in the open source community

    Posted in Developing Software, Neural Nets and AI Stuff on May 24, 2019

    In a blog post too obviously spreading fear, uncertainty, and doubt regarding Iota, writer Nick Johnson declares, among other things: "Iota is a bad actor in the open source community."  Here is his justification:

    Next, and in my mind most damningly, Sergey Ivancheglo, Iota’s cofounder, claims that the flaws in the Curl hash function were in fact deliberate; that they were inserted as ‘copy protection’, to prevent copycat projects, and to allow the Iota team to compromise those projects if they sprang up.

    This seemed to be a rather intriguing piece of information -- one of those where the guy ...

  • Why voiceprint will be around for a long time to come

    Posted in Developing Software, Neural Nets and AI Stuff on May 24, 2019

    I've been researching voiceprints, Kaldi, and speech-recognition in general, and stumbled upon this gem. It's clear that voiceprint is going to be around for a long time to come, because it sits in a sort of "Goldilocks zone" of the ease-of-use vs. secure spectrum in several ways. Look at this chart, and see if you don't agree:

    This is an image from an article... hmmm..... [rustle rustle paper rustle].... erm.... I just spent several minutes looking for... and cannot find at the moment. As soon as I find it, I'll update this post with the URL for the article.

    Found it. https://medium.com/@Ali...

  • Grammar and peering inside the black box of cybernetic intelligence

    Posted in Neural Nets and AI Stuff on May 24, 2019

    This is the first time I've heard we're able to see inside the famous "black box" of cybernetic intelligence. Maybe others have peered inside and I don't know about it, but I'm very intrigued by this line in the story. (He's talking about AND-OR-Grammar-nets):

    "AOGNets are also more interpretable, meaning users can see how the system reaches its conclusions." -- Tianfu Wu, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at NC State and corresponding author of a paper on the work.

    "We found that hierarchical and compositional grammar gave us a simple, elegant way to unify the appr...

  • The Psychology of Uncertainty and Three-Valued Truth Tables

    Posted in Mathy Stuff, Neural Nets and AI Stuff, Postinfinity Tergiversation on May 16, 2019

    The best evidence I've encountered yet that the way we've learned to use binary logic is not our natural way of thinking comes out of psychology, where they have developed a trivalent way to evaluate truth values out of necessity, because people keep using logic this way, naturally:

    Psychological research on people's understanding of natural language connectives has traditionally used truth table tasks, in which participants evaluate the truth or falsity of a compound sentence given the truth or falsity of its components in the framework of propositional logic. One perplexing result concerned ...

  • "I want an agency that makes sure no important thing remains undone because it doesn’t fit somebody's mission"

    Posted in Developing Software, Neural Nets and AI Stuff on May 14, 2019

    Secretary of Defense Neil McElroy said: "I want an agency that makes sure no important thing remains undone because it doesn’t fit somebody's mission." And so IARPA was created. IARPA / DARPA was involved in creating Babel and Kaldi, among other things of course.

    Now I'm learning Kaldi. (Just getting started). Curiousity about the following intoductory slide led me to make this post.

     

  • Binary logic is actually ternary in structure

    Posted in Everything, Mathy Stuff, Postinfinity Tergiversation, Pre-Preprint Stuff on May 08, 2019

    This is one of those things which thoroughly surprises me, because it seems so obvious, yet it has taken me more than a couple decades to learn how to see. I've written about the idea being revealed here from a number of directions, but never before have I seen it with the clarity that I now see. The implications are significant, extending directly to Gödel's famous incompleteness proofs, and the foundations of set theory.

    Here is an illustration I made to capture the idea as it presented itself to my mind this morning:

    Take a moment to think about what is being described here.

    As far as I kn...

  • Beautiful photos show how water can look when it's blasted with sound

    Posted in Everything on May 07, 2019

    Linden Gledhill, a pharmaceutical biochemist, builds custom gear that can record the beautiful, weird, and sometimes bizarre intersection of science, art, and nature. His latest photographs of cymatics, or standing waves in water, are breathtaking.

    Source: Trippy photos show how beautiful water can look when it's blasted with sound